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Solidarity Alert : FIRST INDIVISIBLE MARCH

  • Kalakaua Ave and Kapahulu Ave (map)

Solidarity Alert : MAKE NOISE / SHOW YOUR OUTRAGE / DEMONSTRATE OUR SOLIDARITY

August 26 is the 97th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, granting women the right to vote. On this day we will loudly object to Trump, his administration, and the GOP's full frontal attack against hard won advances toward social justice. RSVP

(Note : In the suffrage parade of 1913 organized by Alice Paul’s Congressional Union, black women were asked to march in a segregated unit. Ida B. Wells, founder of Alpha Suffrage Club of Chicago, refused to do so, and slipped into her state’s delegation after the start of the parade.)

(Note : In the suffrage parade of 1913 organized by Alice Paul’s Congressional Union, black women were asked to march in a segregated unit. Ida B. Wells, founder of Alpha Suffrage Club of Chicago, refused to do so, and slipped into her state’s delegation after the start of the parade.)

Co-Hosted by: Indivisible Hawai‘i, 808Ran, Women's March Hawai‘i, Amnesty International Hawai‘i Chapter

WHEN : Saturday, August 26, 5:30-8:00pm

WHERE: Meet at Honolulu Zoo entrance (Kalakaua Ave + Kapahulu Ave) and March to Trump Waikiki (near Fort DeRussy)

WHO : ALL OF US!! (see left image caption)

OPTIONAL DRESS : Suffragette or Whatevas... (Join Suffragettes for Women's March or email)

Please RSVP


* August 26 is the 97th anniversary of the 19th Amendment which granted women the right to vote. While undoubtedly a step toward social justice there was an ingrained racism within most (but not all) of the suffragette movement, the force behind the Women’s Vote. This blindspot was present throughout the global suffrage movement. White suffragettes in the UK had a very problematic relationship with colonialism. The Canadian suffragettes actively worked to toward women’s votes on the backs of Asians, by promising White men that it will vote to enforce the Chinese Exclusion Act. Anti-Black and anti-Asian racism was often voiced by the U.S. counterpart. Many White U.S. suffragettes were outraged by the post-Civil War 15th Amendment, which granted the vote to Black men, but not to women (however they were racialized). This racism was often challenged. Most famously perhaps by Sojourner Truth, a former slave, who in 1951 addressed the National Women's Rights Convention with her "Ain't I a Woman" speech.

The successful campaign in the U.S. to win Women's right to vote in 1920 also ushered in other changes:

  1. Amidst racist fears of the potential for Black power - of both Black women and men - many jurisdictions (and the entire South) enacted laws that worked to prevent Black people from voting. SU.S.an B. Anthony, infamously stated, “I will cut off this right arm of mine before I will ever work or demand the ballot for the Negro and not the woman.”
  2. Many other people who were formally U.S. citizens also faced barriers to their voting, e.g. those incorporated into the U.S. as citizens after the Mexican-American war. Moreover, after the 14th amendment of 1868 granted U.S. citizenship to anyone born in the U.S., except those people classified as “Indian” who lived on reserves and, as such, were not taxed by the state. However, some people racialized as “Indians” but who no longer held this status, were included as U.S. citizens. The 1856 Dred Scott decision treated (racialized, but not juridical) “Indians” as naturalized “foreigners” within the United States. Juridical “Indians” were given U.S. citizenship status in 1924 with the passing of the Indian Citizenship Act.
  3. Many people were not allowed to become citizens of the U.S. because of racism (mainly Asians), and, thus, were prevented from voting. It was not until the 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act that racist exclusions for certain “foreigners” naturalizing into U.S. citizenship were removed.

READ how Frances E. Willard, one of the leaders of the suffragette movement and the national president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, used racism directed at Black people to try and get White women the vote (and the successful pushback she received from Black suffragette and early civil rights leader, Ida B. Wells).


Earlier Event: August 26
FREE SCREENING : CHASING ICE
Later Event: August 27
PLANNING MEETING