FREE SCHOOL : Slavery in American History and Memory
Nov
16
5:30 PM17:30

FREE SCHOOL : Slavery in American History and Memory

If it’s so Hard, Why Talk About It? Slavery in American History and Memory

WHO : Lois E. Horton, Professor of History Emerita, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
WHEN : Thursday, November 16th, 5:30-7:00 pm
WHERE :  Aliʻiōlani Hale, 417 South King

Dr. Lois E. Horton holds an MS degree in Psychology from the University of Hawaiʻi and a PhD in Social Policy from the Heller School at Brandeis University. She has taught sociology and history, has been a visiting professor of American Studies at the University of Munich and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, and held the John Adams Distinguished Fulbright Chair in American History at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands in 2003.

Professor Horton’s work on African American communities, race, gender and social change has been published in the U.S. and Europe. She has authored and edited nine books, many with historian James O. Horton, including Slavery and the Making of America, the companion book for a 2004 WNET PBS series, and her most recent book is Harriet Tubman and the Fight for Freedom: A Short History with Documents. Two generations of scholarship in recent African American History have shed new light on the nation’s past.

Understanding the problems of present-day society requires knowledge and understanding of that past, particularly of the long history of American slavery—often called America’s original sin. Americans see optimism and hope, a belief in justice and equality, as their national heritage. Yet, slavery continues to haunt this heritage. Racial slavery contradicted the nation’s founding principles, and rationalizations attempted to reconcile this fundamental contradiction by asserting that enslaved people were racially inferior and dangerous. Today, conflicts over Confederate memorials, the Black Lives Matter Movement, mass incarceration, and economic inequality show how those rationalizations still have consequences for the present and future of justice in America. 

RSVP @ 539-4995 or Teri@jhchawaii.net. If you require accommodation for disability, contact 539-4999.
 
This lecture is part of a larger program titled, In Honor of James Oliver Horton: Addressing the “Tough Stuff” of American History and Memory, November 16-18, 2017.  11/16-17 are free and open to the public. See hihumanities.org/horton

Presented by the Judiciary History Center, Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, Museum Studies Graduate Certificate Program, the Department of American Studies at the University of Hawai‘i, and the National Endowment for the Humanities Legacy of Race Initiative 

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FREE SCHOOL : LECTURE / NANDITA SHARMA
Nov
16
12:00 PM12:00

FREE SCHOOL : LECTURE / NANDITA SHARMA

Free School : Lecture (hosted by UHM Geography Colloquium)

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The People Of a Place versus the People out of Place: Ideas of Indigenous Territorial Sovereignty in the Nationalist Politics of Anti-immigration

WHO : Nandita Sharma, Associate Professor, Sociology and Hawai‘i J20+ member

WHEN : Thursday, Nov 16 noon to 1pm

WHERE : UH Manoa Saunders Hall, room 443

In today’s postcolonial world, people who have been constituted as Natives and as Migrants are largely seen to be separate, discrete and, increasingly, as naturally opposed. Within autochthonous discourses, all those who cannot claim autochthonous status are portrayed as illegitimate occupiers of Native place. This is significant, not only because the negative dualities of Native vs. Migrant are mobilized in some of the most hotly contested and violent political events of our time, but also because such distinctions profoundly shape – and, arguably, foreclose - the ideas and practices of liberation and decolonization. My paper brings those identified as Natives and Migrants into the same field of analysis to examine how they both exist within the same global field of power known as postcoloniality and, crucially, how this field of power rests upon their analytic and political separation. I investigate the political work done by the colonial-era partitioning of people into mutually exclusive categories of Native and Migrant in today’s world by analyzing the temporal simultaneity of the post-WWII hegemony of the global system of national-states and the simultaneous expansion, intensification and racialization of immigration controls. Examining these developments in relationship to one another reconciles analytically separated spheres of political sovereignty, economic power and ideas of societal membership and further illuminate the particularity of postcolonial governmentality. I develop a more complete analysis of the importance of ideas of Native-ness to postcolonial relations of ruling to better understand the conflation between migration and colonial occupation evident in native nationalisms today – both “from above” and “from below.”

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FREE SCHOOL : ARTIST MEL CHIN
Nov
15
5:30 PM17:30

FREE SCHOOL : ARTIST MEL CHIN

  • ART Auditorium - University of Hawai‘i at Manoa (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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The Dai Ho Chun Endowment for Distinguished Chair in the Colleges of Arts & Sciences Presents

MEL CHIN / TROUBLE in MIND

WHEN : Wednesday, November 15, 2017
reception  5:30-6:15pm / public lecture  6:30-7:30pm

WHERE : Art Building Bamboo Courtyard and Auditorium, UH Mānoa Campus

There has always been much trouble in the world, and in a wired world, we are more conscious of the problems than ever before. What are the expectations for art to provide solutions or response? Artist Mel Chin will talk about his art and practice as attempts to provide and provoke greater social awareness of toxic situations found in both politics and the environment.

ABOUT MEL CHIN : Chin's sculpture practice bridges natural, political, and social ecologies. In 1989, he developed Revival Field, a project that was a pioneer in the field of “green remediation,” the use of plants to remove toxic, heavy metals from the soil. From 1995 to 1998, Chin formed a collective that produced In the Name of the Place, a conceptual public art project conducted on the popular prime-time TV series, Melrose Place. In KNOWMAD, Chin worked with software engineers to create a video game based on rug patterns of nomadic people facing cultural disappearance. His hand-drawn, 24-minute film, 9-11/9-11, won the prestigious Pedro Sienna Award—the “Oscar” of Chile—for best animation in 2007.  His ongoing project, Fundred Dollar Bill/Operation Paydirt, focuses national awareness and prevention on childhood lead poisoning. A multi-venue exhibition of Chin’s work will be presented in New York City in the spring of 2018.  

Chin was featured on PBS's ART 21 series and has received numerous awards and grants from organizations such as the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council for the Arts, Art Matters, Creative Capital, and the Penny McCall, Pollock/Krasner, Joan Mitchell, Rockefeller and Louis Comfort Tiffany foundations, among others. Chin's website is www.melchin.org

These events are made possible by the late Dr. Dai Ho Chun through his estate gift, which established The Dai Ho Chun Distinguished Chair Endowment in the Colleges of Arts & Sciences. Dr. Chun was a distinguished and visionary educator.  The colleges of Arts and Humanities and Languages, Linguistics & Literature, the Department of Art and Art History, and UH Office of Sustainability have helped to promote these events.

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FREE SCHOOL : Professor of Law Charles Lawrence III
Nov
15
12:00 PM12:00

FREE SCHOOL : Professor of Law Charles Lawrence III

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“We’ve Been Here Before: Free Speech in the Academy, a Primer on the First Amendment and Progressive Responses to Neo-Nazi’s on Campus”

Race, Representation, and Empire In E.P.    
Jones’s The Known World and in Contemporary Racial Narratives

Who : Charles R. Lawrence III / Professor of Law / UH Mānoa Centennial Professor
When : Wednesday, November 15, 12 noon to 1:15pm
Where : Burns Hall Rm. 2118 (East/West Center) UH Manoa

Details to Come

Open to members and guests of of the ICSGCP. No recordings or videotaping permitted. 

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FREE SCREENING "OKINAWA: THE AFTERBURN"
Nov
11
3:00 PM15:00

FREE SCREENING "OKINAWA: THE AFTERBURN"

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11/11 Armistice Day Memorial & Free Film

Okinawa: the Afterburn

A Film by John Junkerman, 2015, English & Japanese w/ English narration & subtitles) [See Trailer]

WHEN : Saturday, November 11, 3 - 530pm
WHERE : Honolulu Friends Meeting House 2426 O‘ahu Avenue (& University Ave)

Armistice Day is a day to commemorate the end of wars after WWI, before it was repurposed into “Veteran’s Day.”  We will honor the original intention of 11/11 & feature a film about Okinawa’s ongoing movement for freedom from war, as an example of humanity’s aspirations for genuine security & peace.

For more info: 808-782-0023   dok@riseup.net

A Project of Veterans for Peace (Hawai`i & Okinawa Chapters), Hawai‘i Peace & Justice, Hawai`i Okinawa Alliance, and Amnesty International Hawai‘i Chapter

wheelchair accessible • light-refreshments provided & welcomed • grateful for donations

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FREE SCHOOL : ONE YEAR OF TRUMP
Nov
8
12:00 PM12:00

FREE SCHOOL : ONE YEAR OF TRUMP

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The forum will focus on the escalation on racism since Trump's election. Speakers will be experts in the areas immigration, alt-right organizing, mass incarceration, environment, sex+racism. Last but not least a performance where Trump, Ivanka and their cabinet of billionaires will show up!!

Like what we're doing? Please DONATE to keep things going.  (read about us in the LAtimes)

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MAKE IN : PREP FOR NOV 3 RALLY + NOV 8 TEACH IN
Oct
29
1:00 PM13:00

MAKE IN : PREP FOR NOV 3 RALLY + NOV 8 TEACH IN

Radical Cheerleader Practice for Nov 3 Rally + Preparing Props for Nov 8 Teach in (large painted heads of Trump's crew)

WHEN : Sunday, October 29, 1-5pm

WHERE : UH Manoa ART Building (Room 313/314) 

NOTE : NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

  • Bring 1" and 1/2" paint brushes and paper towels if available.
  • Aloha shirts needed to convert to cheerleaders costumes. 

SESSIONS

SESSIONS

Mnuchin

Mnuchin

DEVOS

DEVOS

PRUITT

PRUITT

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FREE SCHOOL : Art + Shenanigans in the Era of Trump
Oct
18
12:00 PM12:00

FREE SCHOOL : Art + Shenanigans in the Era of Trump

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Who : Mary Babcock + Gaye Chan
When : Weds, October 18, 12 noon to 1:15pm
Where : Burns Hall Rm. 2118 (East/West Center) UH Manoa

Artists Mary Babcock + Gaye Chan are members of Hawai‘i J20+, a nonpartisan activist group that formed in November 2016 to resist Trump and his administration’s onslaught of attacks on social, economic and environmental justice; immigrants/undocumented/refugees; POC/women/LGBTQLA/disability rights; free speech and independent press.

Babcock and Chan will discuss the ways in which they and other Hawai‘i J20 artists have deployed their skills as artists in the resistance, and efforts in working toward a world not susceptible to the lures of Trump-like promises. 

Organized by the UH Cultural Studies Program. Open to members and guests of of the ICSGCP. No recordings or videotaping permitted. 

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FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB
Oct
17
6:30 PM18:30

FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB

WHEN : Tuesday, October 16 at 6:30pm
WHERE : Chiko's Tavern (930 McCully)

As a continuation of our discussion on housing activism and making struggles visible, the readings are all about eviction struggles on O‘ahu 

Two readings are in the Google Drive folder

• A zine on the anti-eviction struggles in Honolulu's Chinatown in the 1970s and 1980s

• A text excerpt from the 1970 special issue of the Hawaii Free People's Press on the Kalama Valley eviction struggle

+ A short article about Sand Island evictions on Flux Hawaii

+ 24-minute documentary The Sand Island Story (1981) which documents Sand Island residents attempts to forestall eviction by the State of Hawai'i.

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FREE SCHOOL : STUDENT DEBT CRISIS
Oct
4
6:00 PM18:00

FREE SCHOOL : STUDENT DEBT CRISIS

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Join AAUW Honolulu for a panel discussion on the student debt crisis! We will explore how female students are struggling to pay off student debt and how we can address those issues here in Hawai‘i.

WHAT : AAUW will present their newest research: Deeper in Debt: Women and Student Loans, which finds that women hold a larger share of the student debt in the US and are struggling to pay off that debt. Our local panel of experts will discuss how the student debt crisis is impacting women in Hawaii and specific ways to address those issues.

WHEN : Wednesday, October 4  - 6-8:00pm

WHERE : Neil Blaisdell Center, Hawai‘i Suites

+ FREE Dinner! / DETAILS + RSVP

an't make the event? Click here to learn more about the research!

 

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FREE SCREENING + SPEAKERS : CITY OF GHOSTS
Sep
28
6:00 PM18:00

FREE SCREENING + SPEAKERS : CITY OF GHOSTS

  • Honolulu Museum of Art / Doris Duke Theatre (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

CITY OF GHOSTS

Official Selection. Sundance Film Festival

DOORS OPEN AT 5:30PM / FREE ADMISSION : FIRST COME FIRST SERVE



6:00PM

Film Screening

(opening remarks by Hawai‘i AG Doug Chin)

J20+ is once again partnering with the Doris Duke Theatre, in support of their principled stance against President Trump's Muslim Ban. City of Ghosts brings attention to the real-life consequences of the Muslim Ban, under which no refugees from anywhere in the world are currently able to enter the US; and President Trump's withdrawal of US support for the opposition to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Syrians fleeing Assad's murderous regime constitute the world's largest group of refugees.

City of Ghosts is an unprecedented, on-the-ground transmission from the front lines of one of the most important battles of our time: the fight against the Islamic State. It is a war being waged not only on the ground, but in the digital trenches of social media. Academy Award-nominated director Matthew Heineman (Cartel Land) takes viewers into the war zone of ISIS-occupied Syria, where a band of anonymous activists known as Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently wage a counteroffensive against the terrorist group's campaign of propaganda and misinformation. Armed with video cameras, these intrepid citizen journalists risk their lives to spread the truth about life under ISIS. The unforgettable images they've captured and the stories they have to tell are a wake-up call to the world.

See TRAILER

Selected quotes from reviews:

"Matthew Heineman's return to Sundance after his Oscar-nominated Cartel Land is a triumphant one. Where his previous film was a journalistic masterclass in taking access to the extreme, City of Ghosts instead turns the camera on heroic journalists themselves. In doing so, Heineman may have made the definitive contemporary documentary about the tragedy of Syria, as well as an epoch-defining piece on modern media tactics." The Guardian

"Heineman pulls no punches on showing the brutality that is enacted by the radical group, and it makes for an extremely effective doc with such a personal core." Roger Ebert

"Heineman offers up a double portrait of devastation, of a truly destroyed city and of partially decimated survivors, leaving the viewer with an empathetic sense of deep sorrow." Hollywood Reporter

"Heineman poignantly weaves together big-picture themes with intimate events...a powerful reminder of how essential freedom of the press really is, and how easily it can be taken away." AV Club

"What City of Ghosts does best is to humanize those who've suffered most from the conflict in Syria, educating us through both outrage and compassion." Variety

"This story should be required viewing for anyone engaging in discussion of the refugee 'problem'... a profound study in bravery" New York Post

"The experience of watching City of Ghosts is similar to Cartel Land in that you remain wide-eyed, jaw dropped the entire time...Ultimately, the film quietly asserts itself and the work of RBSS as crucial weapons in the fight against ISIS. If ISIS is fighting a war of propaganda, banning satellite dishes and internet access and cameras, those are the tools that the citizens can and must use to resist these forces, to expose their truth." The Playlist

"Timely, pressing, important." Seattle Times

"Ghosts becomes a portrait of true, and terrifying, heroism - but with a devastating personal and emotional price." Flavorwire

7:45 - 8:45PM

Post-Screening Panel Featuring Internationally- Renowned Speakers

Speakers : Members of Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently

Abdalaziz Alhamza, co-founder
Hamoud Al-Mousa, co-founder
Walaa Atlahaan, member

Moderator: Nandita Sharma - Associate Professor of International Migration and Racism, Sociology, University of Hawai‘i at Manoa

8:45PM ->

Moderated Conversation at the Museum Cafe


Hawai‘i J20+ seeks monetary contributions to make this event possible. 

"From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs," Karl Marx 1875

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FREE SCHOOL : Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently
Sep
28
12:00 PM12:00

FREE SCHOOL : Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently

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“We wanted to be free”: Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently and the Progressive Resistance against Assad, ISIL, and Imperialism in Syria 

Who : Abdalaziz Alhamza & Walaa Altahhan (Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently)
When : Thursday, September 28, 12 noon to 1:15pm
Where : Burns Hall Rm. 2118 (East/West Center) UH Manoa

More about Raqqa is being Slaughtered Silently + a Free Screening of a film, City of Ghosts, about them and their work.  

Open to members and guests of of the ICSGCP. No recordings or videotaping permitted. 

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FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB
Sep
26
6:30 PM18:30

FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB

WHEN : Tuesday, Sept. 26 at 6:30pm
WHERE : Chiko's Tavern (930 McCully)

READINGS : (40 pages)

  1. Commanding a movement: the youth council commandos’ quest for quality housing

  2. http://200nightsoffreedom.org/

  3.  

    Joshua Bloom and Waldo Martin's Black Against Empire 

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B8r5chCTP5A-Yl9LWndLZ3NMNUZkM3k4aDQ0MHVfR0ZXbG5n

  4. Optional suggestion : skim this review of the book to get a sense of things overall

    http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/156405

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Free School : Faith, Immigration, & Solidarity
Sep
19
7:00 PM19:00

Free School : Faith, Immigration, & Solidarity

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It is important in these times that faith-based and social advocacy groups unite in Solidarity to resist destructive immigration policies and to provide support for neighbors, friends, and family at risk of being detained or profiled.  What concrete actions can WE take to build the social and political coalitions that we need for the communities that we need to live in?

PANELISTS

• Hawai‘i State Representative Della Au Bellati

• Imam Matiullah Joyia – Imam/Missionary for the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Hawai‘i

• Rev. Rona Mangayayam / Harris UMC

• Nandita Sharma / J20+ Immigration Team Co-Chair

Moderator : Nathalie Rita / J20+ Immigration Team Co-Chair

Co-sponsored with Interfaith Alliance Hawai‘i

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FREE SCHOOL : Sanctuary, Civility and Aloha
Sep
14
3:30 PM15:30

FREE SCHOOL : Sanctuary, Civility and Aloha

  • Richardson Law School - Classroom 2 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Sanctuary, Civility + Aloha / How will we respond as educators?

WHEN : Thursday, September 14 / 3:30 - 5:30 PM
WHERE : Richardson School of Law, Classroom 2

For more information / UHIP@hawaii.edu

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The Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution and the William S. Richardson School of Law will celebrate the International Day of Peace and Constitution Day with a talk and panel discussion that consider Hawai’i’s commitment to the protection of the environment and our civil liberties.

Opening Remarks: Mari Matsuda, Professor, William S. Richardson School of Law

Keynote Speaker: Justice Sabrina S. McKenna, Supreme Court of the State of Hawai‘i

Panel Discussion: Developing social justice action plans

Presentation: Borjana Lubura, UHM Doctoral Student / European Migration Crises in Serbia

Discussion: Needed Solutions and Policies / Panelists:

  • Tamara Albertini, Professor, Philosophy and Islamic Studies
  • Ibrahim Aoude, Professor, Ethnic Studies and Middle East Studies
  • Jon Osorio, Dean, Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies
  • Konrad Ng, Executive Director, Shangri La
  • Hakim Ouansafi, President, Muslim Association of Hawai’i

Moderator: Clare Hanusz, Attorney, Aloha Immigration

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FREE SCHOOL : Burning Crosses
Sep
13
12:00 PM12:00

FREE SCHOOL : Burning Crosses

Burning Crosses and the intersectional feminist subjective: a critical race theorist responds to Charlottesville and the RAV case.

Who : Professor Mari Matsuda, John Richardson School of Law, UH Manoa
When : Weds. Sept. 13, 12:00 - 1:15PM
Where : Burns Hall Rm. 2118 (East/West Center) UH Manoa

In RAV vs. City of St. Paul, the US Supreme Court struck down a hate crime ordinance that was used to penalize the burning of a cross on a Black family’s front lawn. Critical race theorists have, for decades, challenged the analysis that treats racist hate speech as protected political expression, arguing that burning crosses are intended to, and have the effect of, assaulting victims - no different from spitting, shoving, and other acts of hate that are routinely criminalized. The fourth rise of the Ku Klux Klan, inaugurated on January 20, 2017, once again revives the hate speech/free speech debate.  My work supporting criminalization of hate speech is regularly attacked by civil libertarians, post-structuralist
feminists (see Judith Butler’s Excitable Speech), as well as Nazis. This talk is an attempt to work through my disagreements with progressive allies in the context of a global reinvigoration of white supremacist hate groups, and to apply the deeply contextual, experiential, collective method of critical race theory to this work.

About Matsuda : From her earliest academic publications, Matsuda has spoken from the perspective and increasingly used the method that has come to be known as critical race theory. She is not only one of its most powerful practitioners, but is among a handful of legal scholars credited with its origin. The voices she has in mind are the voices that have been left out, “outsider” voices speaking as individuals and as members of their communities of origin, voices of subordinate peoples.

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FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB
Sep
12
6:30 PM18:30

FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB

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Continued Conversation on NO is not enough!, and more

WHEN : Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 6:30pm
WHERE : Chiko's Tavern (930 McCully)


READINGS : (20 pages)

1- out of the woods, On Climate / Borders / Survival / Care / Struggle (http://www.basepublication.org/?p=474)

2- Beautiful Trouble (download)

- principle: think narratively (p. 186-187)

- turn the tables (p. 190-191)

HOMEWORK : a demand for the j20+ manifesto

Questions raised from Aug 22 Book Club...

- What does a global commons look like specifically? What would a manifesto of such outline?

- What are the potential lines of power when we think of a global identity instead of a national identity?

- What can we take from Klein? Specifically I am conflicted about how to reconcile the need to leap forward rather than move incrementally

- Should we make a list of demands (per Nandita) and not settle a focus for J20+? And who or what are we demanding this of? 
- What is the power chain and where can we find our power in it?

- Don't people need boundaries to have some semblance of order as they exist in the world?

- Nonpartisan question campaigns (tag the streets with moral questions): 
What type of work is worth more and why?
What work is worth less and why? etc

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FREE SCREENING : CHASING ICE
Aug
26
1:00 PM13:00

FREE SCREENING : CHASING ICE

  • Honolulu Museum of Art / Doris Duke Theatre (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Chasing Ice at Doris Duke Theater

Showtimes: Saturday Aug 26, 1:00 PM  / to reserve a free seat

Location: Doris Duke Theatre

Directed by Jeff Orlowski. USA. 2012. 75 min.

Supporting sponsor: The EACH Foundation

Media sponsor: Honolulu Civil Beat    
Community partner: UH Office of Sustainability 

Admission: This is a free, ticketed event. Reserve a spot through the dropdown menu above.

In this visually stunning documentary, director Jeff Orlowski follows renowned National Geographic photographer James Balog on a mission to place 30 cameras across three continents to gather visual evidence of the Earth’s melting ice. In collaboration with Honolulu Civil Beat, join us for a post-screening panel discussion with environmental scientists and educators who will address climate change issues affecting Hawai‘i. Panelists to be announced. 

This event takes place in conjunction with a special screening of Chasing Coral, Sunday, Aug. 27 at 1pm, followed by a post-screening panel discussion with Maxine Burkett, Camilo Mora, and Malia Nobriga-Olivera, moderated by Matthew Lynch.

Maxine Burkett is a professor at the William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai‘i and a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. An expert in the law and policy of climate change, she has presented her work on diverse areas of climate law throughout the United States and in West Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean.  

Camilo Mora is an assistant professor of geography at UH Mānoa. Mora's research focuses on biogeography, threats to biodiversity, global conservation assessments and methods for macroecology. His recent research on "Deadly Global Heatwaves" was widely reported by mainstream media around the world. The Mora lab focuses on interconnected lines of research aimed to understand how biodiversity patterns are generated and modified by human activities and, in the process, identifying the conditions where suitable conditions for humans and biodiversity are met.

Malia Nobriga-Olivera is a faculty member at Hawai‘inuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge—one of the largest schools of indigenous knowledge in the United States—and serves as director of the LAMA Program "Loli Aniau, Maka‘ala Aniau" (Climate Change, Climate Alert) whose mission is to catalyze climate adaptation and resiliency by engaging communities in Hawai’i and beyond.

Matthew Lynch is the system sustainability coordinator for the ten campuses of the University of Hawai‘i, providing support to enhance the existing sustainability work underway. He is also founder of of the Honolulu-based nonprofit, Asia-Pacific Center for Regenerative Design, and currently serves on the board of directors for Kahumana Organic Farm, Slow Food Oahu, and Hawai‘i Green Growth.

 

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Dismantling Mass Incarceration: Prospects for Reform
Aug
16
5:30 PM17:30

Dismantling Mass Incarceration: Prospects for Reform

Dismantling Mass Incarceration: Prospects for Reform

WHEN : Weds, August 16, 5:30 - 6:30pm

WHER : Aliʻiōlani Hale 417 South King Street (behind the Kamehameha Statue) 

King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center in partnership with the Hawaiʻi State Teachers Association presents a talk by Dr. Robert Perkinson, American Studies/UH Mānoa.

Prospects for meaningful criminal justice reform remain surprisingly bright despite recent moves to reinvigorate the War on Drugs, amplify prosecutorial power, and expand immigrant detention. The United States, over the past forty years, has assembled the largest penal system in the history of democracy—it is entrenched, expensive, and bolstered by powerful special interests. Nonetheless, the politics of race, crime, and punishment are now more favorable to progressive policy making, particularly at the state and local levels, than at any time since the 1960s. By understanding the root causes of mass incarceration and by launching viable, community-driven reform campaigns, advocates and organizers may come to regard our current political climate as a moment of opportunity.

Robert Perkinson is an associate professor of American Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. His work has appeared in the New York Times, the New Republic, and The Nation. His book Texas Tough: The Rise of America’s Prison Empire (Metropolitan/Henry Holt) won the PEN American Center’s John Kenneth Galbraith Award for best book of non-fiction published in 2009 and 2010.

For more information, call the Center at 539-4999. To RSVP for a FREE ticket!

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FREE SCHOOL : ETHICS CONVERSATION
Aug
7
6:00 PM18:00

FREE SCHOOL : ETHICS CONVERSATION

ETHICS IN POLITICS

WHEN : Monday, August 7, 6:00 - 7:30pm

WHERE : UH Manoa, Shidler College of Business, Room A-102

Conversation with:

Della Au Belatti / Hawai‘i State House of Representatives, District 24

Rick Blangiardi / General Manager, Hawaii News Now(KGMB-KHNL)

Daniel M. Gluck / Senior Staff Attorney for the ACLU of Hawai‘i, Lecturer in Law, William S. Richardson School of Law

Colleen Hanabusa / U.S. Congressional Representative for Hawai‘i

moderated by Will Weinstein (To Register)


Corruption is rife in today’s political climate from Citizens United to the Koch Brothers and other corporation backed lobbyists. The average cost of running a campaign excludes most everyday people from running meanwhile the “salary” of an elected official is really small – most town council members, state senators, even Congressman can’t afford to commit the time necessary because it won’t pay the bills – meaning that only folks with certain types of careers can run (lawyers, businessman, wealthy). Is the political system rigged against only those who can afford to play the game - run a campaign, survive on political salary which in most cases are very low? Meanwhile, how do we prevent big business from influencing our representatives on important decisions? Should terms limits or caps on political spending be imposed? These and other issues will be taken up on this promising panel.

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Block Breitbart Workshop
Aug
5
10:00 AM10:00

Block Breitbart Workshop

Block Breitbart Workshop

Gaye Chan will lead a step by step workshop on how to get companies + organizations to block Breitbart from their ad placement platforms.  

WHEN : Saturday, August 5, 10am to noon

WHERE : Real Office Centers - Chinatown (1110 Nu‘uanu Ave)

WHAT : Must bring a laptop or tablet

TO REGISTER : Space Limited. Email <gayechan@gmail.com> to reserve a seat

More INFO

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Free Screening  "The Dream is Now"
Jul
29
4:30 PM16:30

Free Screening "The Dream is Now"

Free Screening

"The Dream is Now"

WHEN : Saturday, July 29, 4:30pm
WHERE : Real Office Centers - Chinatown (1110 Nu‘uanu)

“The Dream is Now” gives voice to undocumented children of immigrants in the United States. Both moving and thought-provoking, the film is an opportunity to discuss and decide what is right and how best we can move forward.

Film will be followed with talk story with the ACLU and other members of local immigration and human rights groups.

RSVP HERE

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FREE MOVIE : BEFORE THE FLOOD
Jul
5
6:00 PM18:00

FREE MOVIE : BEFORE THE FLOOD

WHEN : Wednesday, July 5 / 6-8pm
WHERE : Ward Warehouse, 1050 Ala Moana (between Loco Boutique + T&C Surf)

WHAT : Screening "Before the Flood" at the Welcome to Free Speech exhibition

Come experience the Hawaii J20+ special cinema room and behold Leonardo DiCaprio as he travels the globe witnessing first hand the hard reality of climate change.

Movie snacks will be supplied.

TRAILER : https://www.beforetheflood.com/

 

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