STITCH-IN FOR FREE SPEECH
Jun
25
3:00 pm15:00

STITCH-IN FOR FREE SPEECH

WHERE : Ward Warehouse, 1050 Ala Moana (between Loco Boutique + T&C Surf)

WHEN : Sat/Sun, June 24/25 @3-8pm

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

Join the Art + Shenanigans team in a stitch-in this weekend to prepare for WELCOME TO FREE SPEECH Opening Party on July 1. 

We will be making protest handbags bags - and etc - from fabric scraps left over from j20 protests. 


Material Donations Needed

Top Priority:
T-Shirts (any size, style or color. With existing designs ok)
Clean, empty PLASTIC containers with or without lids (from small clean peanut butter jars to laundry detergent bottles to large buckets)
Dry beans, popcorn, rice (or any other small rattly bits)
Bells (jingle bells etc.)
Umbrellas (standard-sized hand-held rain protection)
Wooden spoons
Metal trash can lids

also needed:
Bed sheets
Paint brushes for glue
Fabric scraps
Felt
Sewing thread
Legwarmers or knee-high socks (non-matching ok)
Duct Tape (or other tape)
Hot Glue Gun and Sticks (regular and/or large sized)
Newspaper
Safety pins
Cookie Tins
Bamboo sticks
Zip ties

drop off at UH Manoa ART Building room 142 (M-F/8-4:30) or bring to the next meeting. questions? HIJ20.ArtShenanigans@gmail.com

STITCH-IN FOR FREE SPEECH
Jun
24
3:00 pm15:00

STITCH-IN FOR FREE SPEECH

WHERE : Ward Warehouse, 1050 Ala Moana (between Loco Boutique + T&C Surf)

WHEN : Sat/Sun, June 24/25 @3-8pm

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

Join the Art + Shenanigans team in a stitch-in this weekend to prepare for WELCOME TO FREE SPEECH Opening Party on July 1. 

We will be making protest handbags bags - and etc - from fabric scraps left over from j20 protests. 


Material Donations Needed

Top Priority:
T-Shirts (any size, style or color. With existing designs ok)
Clean, empty PLASTIC containers with or without lids (from small clean peanut butter jars to laundry detergent bottles to large buckets)
Dry beans, popcorn, rice (or any other small rattly bits)
Bells (jingle bells etc.)
Umbrellas (standard-sized hand-held rain protection)
Wooden spoons
Metal trash can lids

also needed:
Bed sheets
Paint brushes for glue
Fabric scraps
Felt
Sewing thread
Legwarmers or knee-high socks (non-matching ok)
Duct Tape (or other tape)
Hot Glue Gun and Sticks (regular and/or large sized)
Newspaper
Safety pins
Cookie Tins
Bamboo sticks
Zip ties

drop off at UH Manoa ART Building room 142 (M-F/8-4:30) or bring to the next meeting. questions? HIJ20.ArtShenanigans@gmail.com

SUMMER [FREE] SCHOOL : ART+ACTIVISM
Jun
8
6:00 pm18:00

SUMMER [FREE] SCHOOL : ART+ACTIVISM

  • Anyplace Lounge

Launching summer reading group on art and activism !

First meeting agenda: picking a group, planning the summer, setting goals

HOMEWORK : about 10 pages total

contact: hij20.freeschool@gmail.com

Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon
Jun
4
9:00 am09:00

Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

Art Without Borders: A Shangri La Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

WHERE : Honolulu Museum of Art (900 S Beretania) / Education Lecture Hall (below the museum's Palm Courtyard)

Free, ticket required. CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS.

Part of the Seventh Art Stand

Shangri La, in partnership with the Doris Duke Theatre, presents Art Without Borders, a Wikipedia edit-a-thon to enrich and diversify information about art found by online search engines. Participants will learn about critical issues and how to edit entries on Wikipedia. Prior knowledge of Wikipedia and online editing is not required. The edit-a-thon will take place at the end of the Seventh Art Stand.

FREE SCHOOL + MOVIE : The Last Men in Aleppo + Panel
Jun
3
4:00 pm16:00

FREE SCHOOL + MOVIE : The Last Men in Aleppo + Panel

  • Doris Duke Theatre

SOLIDARITY WITH THE SYRIAN RESISTANCE + SYRIAN REFUGEES

FREE ADMISSION : FIRST COME FIRST SERVE



4:00 - 6:00pm

SCREENING : The Last Men in Aleppo

World Documentary Grand Jury Prize Winner, Sundance Film Festival. The film is a part of the Doris Duke Theater's Seventh Art Stand program)

Directed by Feras Fayyad and Steen Johannessen. Syria. 2017. 104 min. Arabic with English subtitles.

In the middle of the night a red fire truck rushes through the streets. We meet Mahmoud and Subhi inside the car engaged in discussion: Are we going to die now? They follow the smell of what they fear is a chemical bomb attack. This is Aleppo, where death surrounds you. Dark and empty with deserted buildings, telling the story of a thousand disrupted lives. Through this trip, searching for survivors, viewers experience the personal story behind the war. Khalid, Subhi and Mahmoud—all founding members of the White Helmets in Aleppo, a group of ordinary citizens who are the first to enter the destroyed buildings and scour through the rubble in search of bodies and signs of life—are now living more or less under siege and constant bombing together with the remaining 350,000 civilians in Aleppo. (Watch Trailer)

6:00 - 7:00pm

PANEL

• Dr. Yassin al-Haj Saleh - Noted Syrian writer and political dissident who writes on political, social and cultural subjects relating to Syria and the Arab world. Saleh was a member of the 2011 resistance to Assad's dictatorship, which Assad murderously suppressed. Al-Haj Saleh is married to Samira Khalil, a communist dissident, former political detainee and a revolutionary activist abducted and "disappeared" in Douma, Syria in December 2013. After 21 months of hiding in Syria, and wanted by both the government and radical Islamist militants, Saleh fled to Turkey where he currently lives.

Feras Fayyad - Director, The Last Men in Aleppo

• Moderator: Nandita Sharma - Associate Professor of International Migration and Racism, Sociology, University of Hawai‘i at Manoa

Amnesty International Workshop : Anti-Muslim Hate
Jun
2
6:00 pm18:00

Amnesty International Workshop : Anti-Muslim Hate

Seventh Art Stand workshops: America I Believe In

WHERE : Doris Duke Theatre, Honolulu Museum of Art (900 S Beretania

Event Information:

Part of the Seventh Art Stand

Hosted by Amnesty International Hawai‘i Chapter, America I Believe In provides training and the necessary tools for people who wish to become better-informed and stronger advocates to support our Muslim, refugee and immigrant communities. Amnesty International will host three separate sessions addressing key issues that will equip the general public on welcoming refugees, rejecting anti-Muslim hate, and denouncing human rights violations and war crimes. Participants will be given guidelines for how to navigate tough conversations and make a difference in the community.

All workshops are free, but require tickets. Reserve via links below. 

Wednesday, May 31, 6-7pm: Confronting fear, hate, and bigotry
Thursday, June 1, 6-7pm: Real facts on immigrants and refugees
Friday, June 2, 6-7pm: Anti-Muslim Hate

Amnesty International Workshop : Real facts on immigrants and refugees
Jun
1
6:00 pm18:00

Amnesty International Workshop : Real facts on immigrants and refugees

Seventh Art Stand workshops: America I Believe In

WHERE : Doris Duke Theatre, Honolulu Museum of Art (900 S Beretania

Event Information:

Part of the Seventh Art Stand

Hosted by Amnesty International Hawai‘i Chapter, America I Believe In provides training and the necessary tools for people who wish to become better-informed and stronger advocates to support our Muslim, refugee and immigrant communities. Amnesty International will host three separate sessions addressing key issues that will equip the general public on welcoming refugees, rejecting anti-Muslim hate, and denouncing human rights violations and war crimes. Participants will be given guidelines for how to navigate tough conversations and make a difference in the community.

All workshops are free, but require tickets. Reserve via links below. 

Wednesday, May 31, 6-7pm: Confronting fear, hate, and bigotry
Thursday, June 1, 6-7pm: Real facts on immigrants and refugees
Friday, June 2, 6-7pm: Anti-Muslim Hate

Amnesty International Workshop : Confronting fear, hate, and bigotry
May
31
6:00 pm18:00

Amnesty International Workshop : Confronting fear, hate, and bigotry

Seventh Art Stand workshops: America I Believe In

WHERE : Doris Duke Theatre, Honolulu Museum of Art (900 S Beretania

Event Information:

Part of the Seventh Art Stand

Hosted by Amnesty International Hawai‘i Chapter, America I Believe In provides training and the necessary tools for people who wish to become better-informed and stronger advocates to support our Muslim, refugee and immigrant communities. Amnesty International will host three separate sessions addressing key issues that will equip the general public on welcoming refugees, rejecting anti-Muslim hate, and denouncing human rights violations and war crimes. Participants will be given guidelines for how to navigate tough conversations and make a difference in the community.

All workshops are free, but require tickets. Reserve via links below. 

Wednesday, May 31, 6-7pm: Confronting fear, hate, and bigotry
Thursday, June 1, 6-7pm: Real facts on immigrants and refugees
Friday, June 2, 6-7pm: Anti-Muslim Hate

Art's Role in Protecting First Amendment Rights
May
29
7:00 pm19:00

Art's Role in Protecting First Amendment Rights

Lecture : Seventh Art Stand talk: Art's Role in Protecting First Amendment Rights

WHERE : Doris Duke Theatre, Honolulu Museum of Art (900 S Beretania

About the Lecture:

Part of the Seventh Art Stand

The ACLU of Hawai‘i's Legal Director Mateo Caballero discusses art’s role in advancing free speech and equal rights. Caballero talks about art as a potent weapon, powerful shield, and form of visionary resistance.

Free, ticket required. CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS.

An interview with Hawai‘i Attorney General Doug Chin
May
27
1:00 pm13:00

An interview with Hawai‘i Attorney General Doug Chin

Lecture : Seventh Art Stand opening talk: An interview with Hawai‘i Attorney General Doug Chin

WHERE : Doris Duke Theatre, Honolulu Museum of Art (900 S Beretania

About the Lecture:

Part of the Seventh Art Stand

Hosted by Honolulu Civil Beat 

Free, ticket required. CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS.

Doors open at 12:30pm.
RSVPs must check in by 12:45pm. 
At 12:45pm, unclaimed seats will be released on a first come, first served basis. 

Honolulu Civil Beat presents a one-on-one interview with Hawai‘i Attorney General Doug Chin, who drew national attention for filing the state’s lawsuit that ultimately halted President Donald Trump’s revised executive order on immigration.

Join us for this rare community talk-story with your attorney general, as we spotlight Hawai‘i’s role in the national conversation about the travel ban. This intimate conversation, moderated by Civil Beat's Yunji De Nies, will serve as a jumping-off point for further discussions throughout the Seventh Art Stand.

For further background, please click here for Civil Beat’s recent coverage and a short clip of the attorney general: Meet The Man Taking On Donald Trump.

Opening reception in the Luce Pavilion. After the talk, enjoy food and wine and learn more about what local organizations are doing in the community to help the islands’ immigrant and refugee populations. The reception will lead into the opening-night concert featuring Syrian visual artist Kevork Mourad at 4pm.

Symposium : Decolonizing Cities
May
5
9:00 am09:00

Symposium : Decolonizing Cities

at UH Mānoa, Hālau o Haumea

To Register

Overseas Guests:
Hirini Matunga: Professor of Maori and Indigenous Development in the Faculty of Environment, Society and Design at Lincoln University, Canterbury Aotearoa New Zealand
Theodore Jojola: Distinguished Professor in Community & Regional Planning Program of the School of Architecture + Planning at the University of New Mexico

Symposium Description:
We seek to open up possibilities for indigenous urbanism and decolonizing urban planning by creating a space to talk about something we are not sure how to define or do but that we know is essential for justice and our collective futures. What does aloha ‘aina look like in Honolulu? How does native knowledge provide solutions to perennial urban dilemmas? What are the key touchstones in the effort to decolonize cities and how can we decolonize urban development and municipal change?

IMMIGRATION POLICY : PAST + PRESENT
Apr
27
5:30 pm17:30

IMMIGRATION POLICY : PAST + PRESENT

hear immigrant stories, learn about pro and anti-immigrant policies, and ways to be an undocu-ally.

Location:  King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center, 417 South King Street

Parking:  Metered Parking available

RSVP:  Click this Eventbrite link

Panelists:

• Brenda Ivelisse, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Kapiʻolani Community College
• Monisha Das Gupta, Chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies, University of Hawaiʻi, Mānoa
• Clare Hanusz, Of Council, Damon Key Leong Kupchak Hastert
• DACA Recipients, Aloha Dream Team

This event is co-sponsored by the Aloha Dream Team and Hawaii State Teachers Union with light pupus provided.  We encourage you to share the attached flyer and forward this email to your networks.

Self-Defense Workshop Series
Apr
25
6:00 pm18:00

Self-Defense Workshop Series

A Self-Defense Series that incorporates a discourse on non-violence with self-defense skills. 

All Welcomed - gender, age, skill level, etc. 

Wear loose-fitting clothing and bring water! Be prepared for a physical workout!!

University of Hawai‘i at Manoa Lower Campus, Athletic Complex Studio 4 (next to L&L Hawaiian Barbecue)

Currently scheduled on Tuesdays, April 4, 18 and 25. 

Questions? hij20.freeschool@gmail.com

    Lecture : John Barile
    Apr
    21
    12:30 pm12:30

    Lecture : John Barile

    THE CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF CRIME IN THE LIVES OF INDIVIDUALS EXPERIENCING HOMELESSNESS

    BY JOHN (JACK) P. BARILE PH.D, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, UH MANOA

    UH Manoa Saunders Hall, room 637

    Individuals experiencing homelessness are more likely to be a victim of a crime, be arrested for a crime, and be incarcerated for a crime compared to housed individuals. The causes and consequences of these associations are often debated and profiled in the media, at neighborhood meetings, and occasionally, at legislative sessions. This presentation will describe the role that social disadvantage plays in the definition of, response to, and consequences of incarceration for individuals with a history of homelessness.

    John (Jack) Barile is an assistant professor at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa in the Department of Psychology. Jack's research concerns ecological determinants of health-related quality of life and program evaluation. Jack serves as the Principal Investigator for the Honolulu City & County Housing First Program and has over 15 years experience working with individuals experiencing homelessness.

    Lecture : Eve Haque
    Apr
    19
    12:00 pm12:00

    Lecture : Eve Haque

    Lecture : Imperiled South Asian Muslim Girlhood and the Multicultural Imagination: Memorializing the Victims of ‘Honour Killings’ in Canada

    By Dr. Eve Haque

    UH Manoa / Burns Hall 2118


    Abstract: With Islamaphobia on the rise and violence against Muslim women most frequently invoked as a rationale for Islamaphobia, this presentation will contribute to the discussion that examines the connection between gendered Orientalism and white settler nationalism,
    specifically in Canada (Zine, 2006; Razack, 2007; Jiwani, 2010).  This presentation will examine the memorialization in Pelham – a small town in rural Southern Ontario – of an ‘honour killing’ which took place in Mississauga, Ontario back in 2007. On September 18th, 2009 at the town square in front of Pelham town hall, a granite memorial bench donated by local business Kirkpatrick Monuments was dedicated to Aqsa Parvez, a 16 year old Canadian Mississauga high school student murdered by her father and older brother on December 10, 2007. This presentation will examine the specific events and rationales that led to the town’s decision to create and dedicate a memorial to Aqsa Parvez, even though there had never been any personal connection between Aqsa, her family and the town of Pelham, Ontario. This presentation will examine how discourses of multicultural tolerance – and the stated limit thereof – are a central strategy in the articulation of forms of exclusion such as Islamaphobia and concrete assertions of white settler national identity and solidarity, with the pernicious outcome of preventing effective anti-violence programming for such incidents of racialized gendered violence.

    Note: This talk is hosted by the International Cultural Studies Program and held in conjuction with the Center for South Asian Studies' Annual Symposium (from April 19-21, 2017) with funding from the Rama Watumull Collaborative Lecture Series Fund of the Center for
    South Asian Studies (CSAS).

    Self-Defense Workshop Series
    Apr
    18
    6:00 pm18:00

    Self-Defense Workshop Series

    A Self-Defense Series that incorporates a discourse on non-violence with self-defense skills. 

    All Welcomed - gender, age, skill level, etc. 

    Wear loose-fitting clothing and bring water! Be prepared for a physical workout!!

    University of Hawai‘i at Manoa Lower Campus, Athletic Complex Studio 4 (next to L&L Hawaiian Barbecue)

    Currently scheduled on Tuesdays, April 4, 18 and 25. 

    Questions? hij20.freeschool@gmail.com

      Lecture : Miranda Joseph
      Apr
      18
      3:00 pm15:00

      Lecture : Miranda Joseph

      Lecture

      SPEAKER : Miranda Joseph

      TITLE : Performative Accounting of Debt, Time, and Labor in the Financialized University

      WHERE : UH Manoa Saunders Hall, room 244

      This presentation brings together an investigation of Maurizio Lazzarato’s theorization of debt with a case study of accounting in the financialized university. Drawing on the work of feminist and Marxist scholars, I note both Lazzarato’s innovations and certain limits in his ability to see and theorize social complexity. In particular, the paper examines Lazzarato’s claims for the newness and newly intensive and extensive powers of debt in contemporary society, which opens on to a discussion of the articulation of time and money, labor and finance capital. Here, the case study of the deployment of various regimes of accounting in the university reveals the articulation of temporal and financial accounts, against an historical sequencing of those modes of accounting (first labor time, then credit-debt), and simultaneously provides a means to explore the extent to which temporal accounting can serve as an intervention against the impacts of monetary accounting.

      Miranda Joseph is Professor of Gender & Women’s Studies at the University of Arizona. She is the author of Debt to Society: Accounting for Life Under Capitalism (2014), which explores modes of accounting (financial, juridical, and managerial) as they are deployed to create, sustain, and transform social relations, with particular attention to gender, race, and sexuality. Her first book, Against the Romance of Community (2002), examines the supplementary relation of community with capitalism in the context of political debates over
      LGBT art and culture and the discourses and practices of NGOs. Her current projects explore the impact of financialization on universities and interdisciplinary collaborations to examine the limits and potentials of various forms of "counter-accounting"; related publications include "Investing in the Cruel Entrepreneurial University" South Atlantic Quarterly 114:3 (July 2015) and "Challenging Assumptions: Crossing Disciplinary Divides to Make Knowledge about Gender and Finance," co-authored with Joyce Serido, Feminist Formations 26.2 (Summer 2014).
       

      Self-Defense Workshop Series
      Apr
      4
      6:00 pm18:00

      Self-Defense Workshop Series

      A Self-Defense Series that incorporates a discourse on non-violence with self-defense skills. 

      All Welcomed - gender, age, skill level, etc. 

      Wear loose-fitting clothing and bring water! Be prepared for a physical workout!!

      University of Hawai‘i at Manoa Lower Campus, Athletic Complex Studio 4

      Currently scheduled on Tuesdays, April 4, 18 and 25. 

      Questions? hij20.freeschool@gmail.com

      MAKE-IN
      Apr
      2
      11:00 am11:00

      MAKE-IN

      sewing.png

      UH Manoa ART Building (Room 306)

      NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

      Join the Art + Shenanigans team in making puppets, noise makers + props for TAX MARCH and other actions


      Material Donations Needed

      Top Priority:
      T-Shirts (any size, style or color. With existing designs ok)
      Clean, empty PLASTIC containers with or without lids (from small clean peanut butter jars to laundry detergent bottles to large buckets)
      Dry beans, popcorn, rice (or any other small rattly bits)
      Bells (jingle bells etc.)
      Umbrellas (standard-sized hand-held rain protection)
      Wooden spoons
      Metal trash can lids

      also needed:
      Bed sheets
      Paint brushes for glue
      Fabric scraps
      Felt
      Sewing thread
      Legwarmers or knee-high socks (non-matching ok)
      Duct Tape (or other tape)
      Hot Glue Gun and Sticks (regular and/or large sized)
      Newspaper
      Safety pins
      Cookie Tins
      Bamboo sticks
      Zip ties

      drop off at UH Manoa ART Building room 142 (M-F/8-4:30) or bring to the next meeting. questions? HIJ20.ArtShenanigans@gmail.com

      James Harding : The Invisible Vanguard: Reflections on Political Movements and Contemporary Avant-Garde Formations
      Mar
      22
      12:00 pm12:00

      James Harding : The Invisible Vanguard: Reflections on Political Movements and Contemporary Avant-Garde Formations

      "The Invisible Vanguard: Reflections on Political Movements and Contemporary Avant-Garde Formations" Lecture by James Harding

      UH Manoa, Burns Hall

      Harding is a Professor of Performance Studies, University of Maryland, College Park. His work focuses on the history of experimental theatre, on post 9/11 theatre and performance, on the intersection of surveillance and performance, and on performance studies more generally. He has just finished a new monograph entitled Performance, Transparency and the Cultures of Surveillance, and he is the author of three previous monographs: The Ghosts of the Avant-Garde(s): Exorcising Experimental Theatre and Performance(Michigan, 2013), Cutting Performances: Collage Events, Feminist Artists and the American Avant-Garde (Michigan, 2010), and Adorno and "A Writing of the Ruins": Essays on Modern Aesthetics and Anglo-American Literature and Culture (SUNY, 1997).  He has co-edited five anthologies, the most recent of which is entitled The Sixties, Center Stage: Mainstream and Popular Performances in a Turbulent Decade and will be published in early 2017.   His articles have appeared in Performing Arts Journal, TDRPerformance InternationalTheatre JournalTheatre SurveyModern Drama, and PMLA.  During the 2016-2017 academic year, he will be a research fellow at the Freie Universität, Berlin’s International Research Center / “Interweaving Performance Cultures” working on a new monograph tentatively entitled, Performance Beyond the Pale: Politics, Sacrifice and Bodies in Extremis.

      Lecture : Andrea Smith / Unreconciled: The Christian Right and Race Reconciliation
      Mar
      21
      3:00 pm15:00

      Lecture : Andrea Smith / Unreconciled: The Christian Right and Race Reconciliation

      Lecture : Unreconciled: The Christian Right and Race Reconciliation

      Lecture

      TITLE : Unreconciled: The Christian Right and Race Reconciliation

      SPEAKER : Andrea Smith

      WHERE : UH Manoa Saunder Hall, room 244

      About 80% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump.  But behind this statistic is a rapidly changing landscape within Christian evangelicalism with respect to race, particularly the rise of a women of color-centered evangelical theology.  This talk will trace this landscape with its beginnings in the development of the race reconciliation movement in the 1990s to current calls to support
      Indigenous decolonization, immigration reform and the Black Lives Matter within even the most conservative strands of Christian evangelicalism.

      Andrea Smith is an scholar, feminist, and activist against violence. Smith's work focuses on issues of violence against women of color and their communities, specifically Native American women. A co-founder of INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence, the Boarding School Healing Project, and the Chicago chapter of Women of All Red Nations, Smith is an Associate Professor in the Department of Media and Cultural Studies at University of California, Riverside.

       

      MAKE-IN
      Mar
      19
      11:00 am11:00

      MAKE-IN

      UH Manoa ART Building (Room 306)

      NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

      Join the Art + Shenanigans team in making puppets, noise makers + props for TAX MARCH and other actions


      Material Donations Needed

      Top Priority:
      T-Shirts (any size, style or color. With existing designs ok)
      Clean, empty PLASTIC containers with or without lids (from small clean peanut butter jars to laundry detergent bottles to large buckets)
      Dry beans, popcorn, rice (or any other small rattly bits)
      Bells (jingle bells etc.)
      Umbrellas (standard-sized hand-held rain protection)
      Wooden spoons
      Metal trash can lids

      also needed:
      Bed sheets
      Paint brushes for glue
      Fabric scraps
      Felt
      Sewing thread
      Legwarmers or knee-high socks (non-matching ok)
      Duct Tape (or other tape)
      Hot Glue Gun and Sticks (regular and/or large sized)
      Newspaper
      Safety pins
      Cookie Tins
      Bamboo sticks
      Zip ties

      drop off at UH Manoa ART Building room 142 (M-F/8-4:30) or bring to the next meeting. questions? HIJ20.ArtShenanigans@gmail.com

      Lecture : Food Ethics and Farm Labor
      Mar
      14
      3:00 pm15:00

      Lecture : Food Ethics and Farm Labor

      LECTURE

      TITLE : Food Ethics and Farm Labor

      SPEAKER : Margaret Gray, Associate Professor of Political Science at Adelphi University & Author of Labor and the Locavore.

      WHERE : UH Manoa, Saunders Hall 244

      In the blizzard of attention around the virtues of local food production, food writers and activists place environmental
      protection, animal welfare, and saving small farms at the forefront of their attention. Yet amid this turn to wholesome and responsible food choices, the lives and working conditions of farmworkers are often an afterthought. Margaret Gray's book, Labor and the Locavore, focuses on one of the most vibrant local food economies in the country, the Hudson Valley that supplies New York restaurants and farmers markets. Based on more than a decade’s in-depth interviews with workers, farmers, and others, Gray’s examination clearly shows how the currency of agrarian values serves to mask the labor concerns of an already
      hidden workforce.

      Margaret Gray is Associate Professor of Political Science at Adelphi University. Her work focuses on the intersection of food politics and the conditions of low-wage, non-citizen workers in the agro-food industry.  Gray also has a decade’s experience working for nonprofits on economic justice. Gray’s book Labor and the Locavore: The Making of a Comprehensive Food Ethic about New York farmworkers and food politics was published by the University of California Press (2014).  Gray won the Best Book Award from the Association for the Study of Food and Society and the Best Book Award from the Labor
      Project of the American Political Science Association.

      PUBLIC FORUM : IMMIGRATION
      Mar
      11
      6:30 pm18:30

      PUBLIC FORUM : IMMIGRATION

      flier-1000.jpg

      TITLE : Immigration Justice for all in Hawai‘i: What Can We Do?

      WHEN : Saturday, March 11 at 6:30 to 8:30pm

      WHERE : Weaver Hall, Church of the Crossroads (1212 University Avenue)

      SPEAKERS :

      • Mateo Cabellero, Legal Director, ACLU Hawai‘i
      • John Egan, Immigration Attorney and head of Migration Counsel
      • Nandita Sharma, Sociology, UHM - Co-Chair, J20+ Immigration Committee
      • and more...