FREE SCHOOL : GOOD TO BE HOME
Feb
23
12:00 PM12:00

FREE SCHOOL : GOOD TO BE HOME

organized by THE UHM CENTER ON THE FAMILY : BROWN BAG SERIES

Good to be home: A pilot study examining changes in health care utilization among chronically homeless adults in a Housing First program

Sarah Yuan, Javzandulam Azuma + JiYeon Kim

WHEN : Friday, February 23, 2018 / 12:00 – 1:00pm

WHERE : UH Manoa, Miller Hall, Room 2 (2515 Campus Road)

feel free to bring your lunch

Contact Dr. Hua Zan at hzan@hawaii.edu or Dr. Jenjira Yahirun at jyahirun@hawaii.edu with any questions. MORE INFO

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FREE SCREENING : AND THEN THEY CAME FOR US
Feb
24
6:00 PM18:00

FREE SCREENING : AND THEN THEY CAME FOR US

hosted by Refuse Fascism Honolulu

Informal potluck + a short discussion on immigration precedes the screening of "And Then They Came for US" by Abby Ginzberg and Ken Schneider (2017, 47 mins)

In 1942 Executive Order 9066 paved the way for the profound violation of constitutional rights that resulted in the forced incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans. This 45 minute film features Japanese Americans as they speak out against the Muslim registry and travel ban and features newfound photos by Dorothea Lange. 

WHEN : Saturday, February 24 at 6 - 8 PM

WHERE : Church of the Crossroads (1212 University Avenue)

more about the FILM

 

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FREE SCHOOL : RADICAL READING GROUP
Feb
27
6:30 PM18:30

FREE SCHOOL : RADICAL READING GROUP

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WHEN : Tuesday, February 27 at 6:30pm
WHERE : Chiko's Tavern (930 McCully)

READINGS : Chapters 5 of Dark Money by Jane Meyer (as epub and PDF)

and the following related articles:

Philanthropy In America Is Becoming 'Ideological Arms Race,' Author Says
https://www.npr.org/2017/04/16/522095087/philanthropy-in-america-is-becoming-ideological-arms-race-author-says

Is Philanthropy Bad for Democracy?
https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/10/is-philanthropy-good-for-democracy/381996/

Policy Plutocrats: How America’s Wealthy Seek to Influence Governance

And for folks who want to read a whole book on this topic, here's a review of The Givers: Wealth, Power, and Philanthropy in a New Gilded Age
 

The book is particularly good at capturing something that discussions of elite philanthropy often miss: The distance between elite “charity” and elite political influence is small and shrinking. The philanthropists profiled here are strategic actors trying to bring about particular outcomes, and they are eager to use their influence in a range of sectors to do so. Foundations interested in changing the educational sphere might spend money both to support charter schools and to lobby for school privatization policies. We often think of charitable donations and elite political influence as categorically distinct activities, but Callahan’s subjects are Good Samaritans and political animals at the same time.
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FREE SCHOOL : Automatic Art, Automated Trading
Mar
21
12:00 PM12:00

FREE SCHOOL : Automatic Art, Automated Trading

Automatic Art, Automated Trading

Arne De Boever

Arne De Boever teaches American Studies in the School of Critical Studies at the California Institute of the Arts, where he also directs the MA Aesthetics and Politics program. He is the author of States of Exception in the Contemporary Novel (2012) and Narrative Care (2013) and editor of Gilbert Simondon: Being and Technology (2012) and The Psychopathologies of Cognitive Capitalism: Vol. 1 (2013). He edits Parrhesia: A Journal of Critical Philosophy and the critical theory/philosophy section of the Los Angeles Review of Books. He is also a member of the boundary 2 collective and an Advisory Editor for the Oxford Literary Review.

When : Weds, March 21, 12 noon to 1:15pm
Where : Burns Hall Rm. 2118 (East/West Center) UH Manoa

Organized by the UH Cultural Studies Program. 

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FREE SCREENING : "216 BEACH WALK, WAIKIKI" WITH DIRECTOR + PANEL
Apr
10
6:30 PM18:30

FREE SCREENING : "216 BEACH WALK, WAIKIKI" WITH DIRECTOR + PANEL

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216 BEACH WALK, WAIKIKI

by Alan Marcus (2018, 30mins)

WHEN : Tuesday, April 10, 6:30 - 8:00pm

WHERE : UH Manoa ART Building (Room 101) 

The film's title refers to the former address of author Jack London during his final year in Hawaii in 1915 when he was stimulating interest in the islands through his writings.  By chance, the same location is now the back door of Trump Int’l Hotel Waikiki.  In the film, high-rise developments serve as magnified totems for a heavily congested urban environment fuelled by Waikiki’s fabled touristic appeal.  The film questions this interpretation of a paradisiacal paradigm in what could otherwise be termed a post-traumatic site, drawing on the creation and toxicity of the Ala Wai Canal as a potent metaphorical comment.  This research project received funding from the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland.

Alan Marcus is is a film practitioner, cultural historian and Professor of Film and Visual Culture at the University of Aberdeen. 

Panelists

+ Sean Connelly is a designer, creative producer, architect, artist, urban ecologist, and educator. He holds a Doctorate of Architecture from the University of Hawai‘i and a Master in Design in Landscape, Urbanism, and Ecology from Harvard University. He is also the author and producer of Hawai'i Futures, a virtual intervention for island urbanism. 

+ Ross W. Stephenson's research covers the development of Waikiki from 1890-1959. Topics include applicable planning theory, population growth, public input, government policy and decisions, investment, infrastructure and the resulting change in the physical landscape.  He has participated in community projects including land use planning, reforestation, cemetery restoration, building rehabilitation, economic revitalization, and resource nominations to both the Hawai‘i State and National Registers of Historic Places.  He is a former Historian for the Hawai‘i Historic Preservation Office of State Department of Land and Natural Resources.

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    FREE SCHOOL : LOST IN TRANSLATION
    Feb
    21
    12:00 PM12:00

    FREE SCHOOL : LOST IN TRANSLATION

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    Lost in Translation : Social Movements and the New Political Imagination

    Žiga Vodovnik

    Vodovnik, PhD, is Professor of Political Science at the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. His teaching and research focus on contemporary political theories and praxes, social movements, and the history of political ideas.

    When : Weds, February 21, 12 noon to 1:15pm
    Where : Burns Hall Rm. 2118 (East/West Center) UH Manoa

    Organized by the UH Cultural Studies Program. 

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    FREE SCHOOL : RADICAL READING GROUP
    Feb
    13
    6:30 PM18:30

    FREE SCHOOL : RADICAL READING GROUP

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    WHEN : Tuesday, February 13 at 6:30pm
    WHERE : Chiko's Tavern (930 McCully)

    READINGS : Chapters 4 of Dark Money by Jane Meyer (as epub and PDF)

    SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS + VIDEO:

    Northern European models of government - 
    https://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21571136-politicians-both-right-and-left-could-learn-nordic-countries-next-supermodel

    Nordic welfare model http://www.nordicwelfare.org/PageFiles/7117/Nordic_Welfare_Model_Web.pdf

    Global inequality showing contrast between US & Western Europe https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/12/15/u-s-lawmakers-are-redistributing-income-from-the-poor-to-the-rich-according-to-massive-new-study/?utm_term=.c138d7c420c7

    VIDEO : What’s Wrong with Capitalism Part 1  https://youtu.be/gJW4-cOZt8A

     

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    FREE SCHOOL : LOST IN TRANSLATION
    Feb
    8
    7:00 PM19:00

    FREE SCHOOL : LOST IN TRANSLATION

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    The Need for an Indigenous Land and Sea Ethic

    Walter Echo-Hawk

    Echo-Hawk is a renowned Native American attorney, tribal judge, activist, law professor, and author of the Courts of the Conqueror: The 10 Worst Indian Law Cases Ever Decided (2010) and In the Light of Justice (2013). 

    WHEN : February 8, 7:00pm - 8:30pm
    WHERE UH Manoa, Art Auditorium

    Organized by UHM American Studies and WSR School of Law

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    FREE SCHOOL : THIS IS NOT A DRILL!
    Jan
    19
    2:30 PM14:30

    FREE SCHOOL : THIS IS NOT A DRILL!

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    POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM

    THIS IS NOT A DRILL!
    The Return to Nuclear War Fighting, Terror, and the New Normal

    Jairus Victor Grove

    UHManoa Department of Political Science

    WHAT : Our fear is acute but the crisis is systemic and a long time in the making. I will do my best to sketch out the emerging Trump Doctrine of nuclear war fighting and how the expansion of executive war powers since World War II enabled it. Furthermore, there is a growing vanguard of strategic thinkers arguing in favor of a new generation of nuclear weapons that would be more useable against competitors like Russia and China but also useable against states like North Korea. I will lay out why the state of concern is based on real changes to nuclear posture and how the instability of this president has drawn attention to a slow brewing constitutional crisis over nuclear command. We live in a country with a nuclear sovereign with no institutional limits. Recent events demand a renewed effort for disarmament and the necessity to demand democratic control of nuclear weapons until they can all be destroyed. I am also happy to answer any question about specific nuclear threats or the recent error in the ballistic missile warning system.  

    WHEN : Friday, January 19, 2018 / 2:30 – 4:00 pm

    WHERE :  UH MANOA, SAUNDERS HALL room 624, Harry Friedman Room

    Partially sponsored by the Student Activity and Program Fee Board (SAPFB)

    NOTE: Colloquium is open to members and guests of the Department of Political Science. No recordings or videotaping permitted

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    FREE SCHOOL : AN EVENING WITH NEAL KATYAL
    Jan
    18
    6:30 PM18:30

    FREE SCHOOL : AN EVENING WITH NEAL KATYAL

    organized by the Japanese American Citizens League-Honolulu Chapter and the William S. Richardson School of Law

    An Evening with Neal Katyal

    “From Korematsu to the Travel Ban: Guarding Against Executive Abuse”

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    WHEN : Thursday, January 18 / 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

    WHERE: William S. Richardson School of Law, Classroom 2

    RSVP Required : jaclhon@gmail.com

    Neal Katyal, former Acting Solicitor General for the United States during the Obama administration, will speak about his work representing the Plaintiffs in Hawai‘i v. Trump, the travel ban case. He has argued this case before Judge Watson in the Honolulu federal District Court and twice before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

    As Acting Solicitor General, Mr. Katyal also issued the first public confession by the Justice
    Department regarding its biased involvement in the Hirabayashi and Korematsu cases in the U.S. Supreme Court. Prior to that, Mr. Katyal also won the landmark decision in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, which successfully challenged the military tribunals in Guantanamo Bay.

    With Introductions from:

    • Deidre Marie-Iha, Deputy Attorney General, State of Hawai‘i
    • Eric K. Yamamoto, Fred T. Korematsu Professor of Law and Social Justice, William S. Richardson School of Law

     

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    FREE SCHOOL : How to get to Universal Health Care in Hawai‘i and the U.S.
    Jan
    16
    5:00 PM17:00

    FREE SCHOOL : How to get to Universal Health Care in Hawai‘i and the U.S.

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    Let's build a movement to demand universal healthcare in the US!

    Overview, Analysis + Solutions / The Broken US Healthcare System

    Stephen Kemble will present an overview of the broken US Healthcare System and the impact of the recent GOPtaxscam. He will provide insights on how to effectively influence national and Hawai‘i State politics in making reforms to improve the healthcare system. 

    Kemble is a professor at the UHM School of Medicine. He is a past president of both the Hawai‘i Psychiatric Medical Association and the Hawai‘i Medical Association. Dr. Kemble has a longstanding interest in health care reform, and he has been appointed to the Hawai‘i Health Authority, charged with overall health planning for the State of Hawai‘i and with designing a universal health care system covering everyone in the State. He is a psychiatrist in private practice and also teaches psychiatric aspects of general medical care to internal medicine residents.

    WHAT : 45 min presentation followed by discussion on building a movement to demand universal healthcare in the US

    WHEN : Tuesday, Jan 16, 2018 / 5 to 630pm

    WHERE : UH Manoa ART Building (Room 101) 

    RSVP

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    FREE SCHOOL : Slavery in American History and Memory
    Nov
    16
    5:30 PM17:30

    FREE SCHOOL : Slavery in American History and Memory

    If it’s so Hard, Why Talk About It? Slavery in American History and Memory

    WHO : Lois E. Horton, Professor of History Emerita, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
    WHEN : Thursday, November 16th, 5:30-7:00 pm
    WHERE :  Aliʻiōlani Hale, 417 South King

    Dr. Lois E. Horton holds an MS degree in Psychology from the University of Hawaiʻi and a PhD in Social Policy from the Heller School at Brandeis University. She has taught sociology and history, has been a visiting professor of American Studies at the University of Munich and the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, and held the John Adams Distinguished Fulbright Chair in American History at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands in 2003.

    Professor Horton’s work on African American communities, race, gender and social change has been published in the U.S. and Europe. She has authored and edited nine books, many with historian James O. Horton, including Slavery and the Making of America, the companion book for a 2004 WNET PBS series, and her most recent book is Harriet Tubman and the Fight for Freedom: A Short History with Documents. Two generations of scholarship in recent African American History have shed new light on the nation’s past.

    Understanding the problems of present-day society requires knowledge and understanding of that past, particularly of the long history of American slavery—often called America’s original sin. Americans see optimism and hope, a belief in justice and equality, as their national heritage. Yet, slavery continues to haunt this heritage. Racial slavery contradicted the nation’s founding principles, and rationalizations attempted to reconcile this fundamental contradiction by asserting that enslaved people were racially inferior and dangerous. Today, conflicts over Confederate memorials, the Black Lives Matter Movement, mass incarceration, and economic inequality show how those rationalizations still have consequences for the present and future of justice in America. 

    RSVP @ 539-4995 or Teri@jhchawaii.net. If you require accommodation for disability, contact 539-4999.
     
    This lecture is part of a larger program titled, In Honor of James Oliver Horton: Addressing the “Tough Stuff” of American History and Memory, November 16-18, 2017.  11/16-17 are free and open to the public. See hihumanities.org/horton

    Presented by the Judiciary History Center, Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, Museum Studies Graduate Certificate Program, the Department of American Studies at the University of Hawai‘i, and the National Endowment for the Humanities Legacy of Race Initiative 

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    FREE SCHOOL : LECTURE / NANDITA SHARMA
    Nov
    16
    12:00 PM12:00

    FREE SCHOOL : LECTURE / NANDITA SHARMA

    Free School : Lecture (hosted by UHM Geography Colloquium)

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    The People Of a Place versus the People out of Place: Ideas of Indigenous Territorial Sovereignty in the Nationalist Politics of Anti-immigration

    WHO : Nandita Sharma, Associate Professor, Sociology and Hawai‘i J20+ member

    WHEN : Thursday, Nov 16 noon to 1pm

    WHERE : UH Manoa Saunders Hall, room 443

    In today’s postcolonial world, people who have been constituted as Natives and as Migrants are largely seen to be separate, discrete and, increasingly, as naturally opposed. Within autochthonous discourses, all those who cannot claim autochthonous status are portrayed as illegitimate occupiers of Native place. This is significant, not only because the negative dualities of Native vs. Migrant are mobilized in some of the most hotly contested and violent political events of our time, but also because such distinctions profoundly shape – and, arguably, foreclose - the ideas and practices of liberation and decolonization. My paper brings those identified as Natives and Migrants into the same field of analysis to examine how they both exist within the same global field of power known as postcoloniality and, crucially, how this field of power rests upon their analytic and political separation. I investigate the political work done by the colonial-era partitioning of people into mutually exclusive categories of Native and Migrant in today’s world by analyzing the temporal simultaneity of the post-WWII hegemony of the global system of national-states and the simultaneous expansion, intensification and racialization of immigration controls. Examining these developments in relationship to one another reconciles analytically separated spheres of political sovereignty, economic power and ideas of societal membership and further illuminate the particularity of postcolonial governmentality. I develop a more complete analysis of the importance of ideas of Native-ness to postcolonial relations of ruling to better understand the conflation between migration and colonial occupation evident in native nationalisms today – both “from above” and “from below.”

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    FREE SCHOOL : ARTIST MEL CHIN
    Nov
    15
    5:30 PM17:30

    FREE SCHOOL : ARTIST MEL CHIN

    • ART Auditorium - University of Hawai‘i at Manoa (map)
    • Google Calendar ICS
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    The Dai Ho Chun Endowment for Distinguished Chair in the Colleges of Arts & Sciences Presents

    MEL CHIN / TROUBLE in MIND

    WHEN : Wednesday, November 15, 2017
    reception  5:30-6:15pm / public lecture  6:30-7:30pm

    WHERE : Art Building Bamboo Courtyard and Auditorium, UH Mānoa Campus

    There has always been much trouble in the world, and in a wired world, we are more conscious of the problems than ever before. What are the expectations for art to provide solutions or response? Artist Mel Chin will talk about his art and practice as attempts to provide and provoke greater social awareness of toxic situations found in both politics and the environment.

    ABOUT MEL CHIN : Chin's sculpture practice bridges natural, political, and social ecologies. In 1989, he developed Revival Field, a project that was a pioneer in the field of “green remediation,” the use of plants to remove toxic, heavy metals from the soil. From 1995 to 1998, Chin formed a collective that produced In the Name of the Place, a conceptual public art project conducted on the popular prime-time TV series, Melrose Place. In KNOWMAD, Chin worked with software engineers to create a video game based on rug patterns of nomadic people facing cultural disappearance. His hand-drawn, 24-minute film, 9-11/9-11, won the prestigious Pedro Sienna Award—the “Oscar” of Chile—for best animation in 2007.  His ongoing project, Fundred Dollar Bill/Operation Paydirt, focuses national awareness and prevention on childhood lead poisoning. A multi-venue exhibition of Chin’s work will be presented in New York City in the spring of 2018.  

    Chin was featured on PBS's ART 21 series and has received numerous awards and grants from organizations such as the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council for the Arts, Art Matters, Creative Capital, and the Penny McCall, Pollock/Krasner, Joan Mitchell, Rockefeller and Louis Comfort Tiffany foundations, among others. Chin's website is www.melchin.org

    These events are made possible by the late Dr. Dai Ho Chun through his estate gift, which established The Dai Ho Chun Distinguished Chair Endowment in the Colleges of Arts & Sciences. Dr. Chun was a distinguished and visionary educator.  The colleges of Arts and Humanities and Languages, Linguistics & Literature, the Department of Art and Art History, and UH Office of Sustainability have helped to promote these events.

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    FREE SCHOOL : Professor of Law Charles Lawrence III
    Nov
    15
    12:00 PM12:00

    FREE SCHOOL : Professor of Law Charles Lawrence III

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    “We’ve Been Here Before: Free Speech in the Academy, a Primer on the First Amendment and Progressive Responses to Neo-Nazi’s on Campus”

    Race, Representation, and Empire In E.P.    
    Jones’s The Known World and in Contemporary Racial Narratives

    Who : Charles R. Lawrence III / Professor of Law / UH Mānoa Centennial Professor
    When : Wednesday, November 15, 12 noon to 1:15pm
    Where : Burns Hall Rm. 2118 (East/West Center) UH Manoa

    Details to Come

    Open to members and guests of of the ICSGCP. No recordings or videotaping permitted. 

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    FREE SCREENING "OKINAWA: THE AFTERBURN"
    Nov
    11
    3:00 PM15:00

    FREE SCREENING "OKINAWA: THE AFTERBURN"

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    11/11 Armistice Day Memorial & Free Film

    Okinawa: the Afterburn

    A Film by John Junkerman, 2015, English & Japanese w/ English narration & subtitles) [See Trailer]

    WHEN : Saturday, November 11, 3 - 530pm
    WHERE : Honolulu Friends Meeting House 2426 O‘ahu Avenue (& University Ave)

    Armistice Day is a day to commemorate the end of wars after WWI, before it was repurposed into “Veteran’s Day.”  We will honor the original intention of 11/11 & feature a film about Okinawa’s ongoing movement for freedom from war, as an example of humanity’s aspirations for genuine security & peace.

    For more info: 808-782-0023   dok@riseup.net

    A Project of Veterans for Peace (Hawai`i & Okinawa Chapters), Hawai‘i Peace & Justice, Hawai`i Okinawa Alliance, and Amnesty International Hawai‘i Chapter

    wheelchair accessible • light-refreshments provided & welcomed • grateful for donations

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    FREE SCHOOL : ONE YEAR OF TRUMP
    Nov
    8
    12:00 PM12:00

    FREE SCHOOL : ONE YEAR OF TRUMP

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    The forum will focus on the escalation on racism since Trump's election. Speakers will be experts in the areas immigration, alt-right organizing, mass incarceration, environment, sex+racism. Last but not least a performance where Trump, Ivanka and their cabinet of billionaires will show up!!

    Like what we're doing? Please DONATE to keep things going.  (read about us in the LAtimes)

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    MAKE IN : PREP FOR NOV 3 RALLY + NOV 8 TEACH IN
    Oct
    29
    1:00 PM13:00

    MAKE IN : PREP FOR NOV 3 RALLY + NOV 8 TEACH IN

    Radical Cheerleader Practice for Nov 3 Rally + Preparing Props for Nov 8 Teach in (large painted heads of Trump's crew)

    WHEN : Sunday, October 29, 1-5pm

    WHERE : UH Manoa ART Building (Room 313/314) 

    NOTE : NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

    • Bring 1" and 1/2" paint brushes and paper towels if available.
    • Aloha shirts needed to convert to cheerleaders costumes. 

    SESSIONS

    SESSIONS

    Mnuchin

    Mnuchin

    DEVOS

    DEVOS

    PRUITT

    PRUITT

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    FREE SCHOOL : Art + Shenanigans in the Era of Trump
    Oct
    18
    12:00 PM12:00

    FREE SCHOOL : Art + Shenanigans in the Era of Trump

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    Who : Mary Babcock + Gaye Chan
    When : Weds, October 18, 12 noon to 1:15pm
    Where : Burns Hall Rm. 2118 (East/West Center) UH Manoa

    Artists Mary Babcock + Gaye Chan are members of Hawai‘i J20+, a nonpartisan activist group that formed in November 2016 to resist Trump and his administration’s onslaught of attacks on social, economic and environmental justice; immigrants/undocumented/refugees; POC/women/LGBTQLA/disability rights; free speech and independent press.

    Babcock and Chan will discuss the ways in which they and other Hawai‘i J20 artists have deployed their skills as artists in the resistance, and efforts in working toward a world not susceptible to the lures of Trump-like promises. 

    Organized by the UH Cultural Studies Program. Open to members and guests of of the ICSGCP. No recordings or videotaping permitted. 

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    FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB
    Oct
    17
    6:30 PM18:30

    FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB

    WHEN : Tuesday, October 16 at 6:30pm
    WHERE : Chiko's Tavern (930 McCully)

    As a continuation of our discussion on housing activism and making struggles visible, the readings are all about eviction struggles on O‘ahu 

    Two readings are in the Google Drive folder

    • A zine on the anti-eviction struggles in Honolulu's Chinatown in the 1970s and 1980s

    • A text excerpt from the 1970 special issue of the Hawaii Free People's Press on the Kalama Valley eviction struggle

    + A short article about Sand Island evictions on Flux Hawaii

    + 24-minute documentary The Sand Island Story (1981) which documents Sand Island residents attempts to forestall eviction by the State of Hawai'i.

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    FREE SCHOOL : STUDENT DEBT CRISIS
    Oct
    4
    6:00 PM18:00

    FREE SCHOOL : STUDENT DEBT CRISIS

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    Join AAUW Honolulu for a panel discussion on the student debt crisis! We will explore how female students are struggling to pay off student debt and how we can address those issues here in Hawai‘i.

    WHAT : AAUW will present their newest research: Deeper in Debt: Women and Student Loans, which finds that women hold a larger share of the student debt in the US and are struggling to pay off that debt. Our local panel of experts will discuss how the student debt crisis is impacting women in Hawaii and specific ways to address those issues.

    WHEN : Wednesday, October 4  - 6-8:00pm

    WHERE : Neil Blaisdell Center, Hawai‘i Suites

    + FREE Dinner! / DETAILS + RSVP

    an't make the event? Click here to learn more about the research!

     

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    FREE SCREENING + SPEAKERS : CITY OF GHOSTS
    Sep
    28
    6:00 PM18:00

    FREE SCREENING + SPEAKERS : CITY OF GHOSTS

    • Honolulu Museum of Art / Doris Duke Theatre (map)
    • Google Calendar ICS

    CITY OF GHOSTS

    Official Selection. Sundance Film Festival

    DOORS OPEN AT 5:30PM / FREE ADMISSION : FIRST COME FIRST SERVE



    6:00PM

    Film Screening

    (opening remarks by Hawai‘i AG Doug Chin)

    J20+ is once again partnering with the Doris Duke Theatre, in support of their principled stance against President Trump's Muslim Ban. City of Ghosts brings attention to the real-life consequences of the Muslim Ban, under which no refugees from anywhere in the world are currently able to enter the US; and President Trump's withdrawal of US support for the opposition to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Syrians fleeing Assad's murderous regime constitute the world's largest group of refugees.

    City of Ghosts is an unprecedented, on-the-ground transmission from the front lines of one of the most important battles of our time: the fight against the Islamic State. It is a war being waged not only on the ground, but in the digital trenches of social media. Academy Award-nominated director Matthew Heineman (Cartel Land) takes viewers into the war zone of ISIS-occupied Syria, where a band of anonymous activists known as Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently wage a counteroffensive against the terrorist group's campaign of propaganda and misinformation. Armed with video cameras, these intrepid citizen journalists risk their lives to spread the truth about life under ISIS. The unforgettable images they've captured and the stories they have to tell are a wake-up call to the world.

    See TRAILER

    Selected quotes from reviews:

    "Matthew Heineman's return to Sundance after his Oscar-nominated Cartel Land is a triumphant one. Where his previous film was a journalistic masterclass in taking access to the extreme, City of Ghosts instead turns the camera on heroic journalists themselves. In doing so, Heineman may have made the definitive contemporary documentary about the tragedy of Syria, as well as an epoch-defining piece on modern media tactics." The Guardian

    "Heineman pulls no punches on showing the brutality that is enacted by the radical group, and it makes for an extremely effective doc with such a personal core." Roger Ebert

    "Heineman offers up a double portrait of devastation, of a truly destroyed city and of partially decimated survivors, leaving the viewer with an empathetic sense of deep sorrow." Hollywood Reporter

    "Heineman poignantly weaves together big-picture themes with intimate events...a powerful reminder of how essential freedom of the press really is, and how easily it can be taken away." AV Club

    "What City of Ghosts does best is to humanize those who've suffered most from the conflict in Syria, educating us through both outrage and compassion." Variety

    "This story should be required viewing for anyone engaging in discussion of the refugee 'problem'... a profound study in bravery" New York Post

    "The experience of watching City of Ghosts is similar to Cartel Land in that you remain wide-eyed, jaw dropped the entire time...Ultimately, the film quietly asserts itself and the work of RBSS as crucial weapons in the fight against ISIS. If ISIS is fighting a war of propaganda, banning satellite dishes and internet access and cameras, those are the tools that the citizens can and must use to resist these forces, to expose their truth." The Playlist

    "Timely, pressing, important." Seattle Times

    "Ghosts becomes a portrait of true, and terrifying, heroism - but with a devastating personal and emotional price." Flavorwire

    7:45 - 8:45PM

    Post-Screening Panel Featuring Internationally- Renowned Speakers

    Speakers : Members of Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently

    Abdalaziz Alhamza, co-founder
    Hamoud Al-Mousa, co-founder
    Walaa Atlahaan, member

    Moderator: Nandita Sharma - Associate Professor of International Migration and Racism, Sociology, University of Hawai‘i at Manoa

    8:45PM ->

    Moderated Conversation at the Museum Cafe


    Hawai‘i J20+ seeks monetary contributions to make this event possible. 

    "From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs," Karl Marx 1875

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    FREE SCHOOL : Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently
    Sep
    28
    12:00 PM12:00

    FREE SCHOOL : Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently

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    “We wanted to be free”: Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently and the Progressive Resistance against Assad, ISIL, and Imperialism in Syria 

    Who : Abdalaziz Alhamza & Walaa Altahhan (Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently)
    When : Thursday, September 28, 12 noon to 1:15pm
    Where : Burns Hall Rm. 2118 (East/West Center) UH Manoa

    More about Raqqa is being Slaughtered Silently + a Free Screening of a film, City of Ghosts, about them and their work.  

    Open to members and guests of of the ICSGCP. No recordings or videotaping permitted. 

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    FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB
    Sep
    26
    6:30 PM18:30

    FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB

    WHEN : Tuesday, Sept. 26 at 6:30pm
    WHERE : Chiko's Tavern (930 McCully)

    READINGS : (40 pages)

    1. Commanding a movement: the youth council commandos’ quest for quality housing

    2. http://200nightsoffreedom.org/

    3.  

      Joshua Bloom and Waldo Martin's Black Against Empire 

      https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B8r5chCTP5A-Yl9LWndLZ3NMNUZkM3k4aDQ0MHVfR0ZXbG5n

    4. Optional suggestion : skim this review of the book to get a sense of things overall

      http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/156405

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    Free School : Faith, Immigration, & Solidarity
    Sep
    19
    7:00 PM19:00

    Free School : Faith, Immigration, & Solidarity

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    It is important in these times that faith-based and social advocacy groups unite in Solidarity to resist destructive immigration policies and to provide support for neighbors, friends, and family at risk of being detained or profiled.  What concrete actions can WE take to build the social and political coalitions that we need for the communities that we need to live in?

    PANELISTS

    • Hawai‘i State Representative Della Au Bellati

    • Imam Matiullah Joyia – Imam/Missionary for the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Hawai‘i

    • Rev. Rona Mangayayam / Harris UMC

    • Nandita Sharma / J20+ Immigration Team Co-Chair

    Moderator : Nathalie Rita / J20+ Immigration Team Co-Chair

    Co-sponsored with Interfaith Alliance Hawai‘i

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    FREE SCHOOL : Sanctuary, Civility and Aloha
    Sep
    14
    3:30 PM15:30

    FREE SCHOOL : Sanctuary, Civility and Aloha

    • Richardson Law School - Classroom 2 (map)
    • Google Calendar ICS

    Sanctuary, Civility + Aloha / How will we respond as educators?

    WHEN : Thursday, September 14 / 3:30 - 5:30 PM
    WHERE : Richardson School of Law, Classroom 2

    For more information / UHIP@hawaii.edu

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    The Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution and the William S. Richardson School of Law will celebrate the International Day of Peace and Constitution Day with a talk and panel discussion that consider Hawai’i’s commitment to the protection of the environment and our civil liberties.

    Opening Remarks: Mari Matsuda, Professor, William S. Richardson School of Law

    Keynote Speaker: Justice Sabrina S. McKenna, Supreme Court of the State of Hawai‘i

    Panel Discussion: Developing social justice action plans

    Presentation: Borjana Lubura, UHM Doctoral Student / European Migration Crises in Serbia

    Discussion: Needed Solutions and Policies / Panelists:

    • Tamara Albertini, Professor, Philosophy and Islamic Studies
    • Ibrahim Aoude, Professor, Ethnic Studies and Middle East Studies
    • Jon Osorio, Dean, Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies
    • Konrad Ng, Executive Director, Shangri La
    • Hakim Ouansafi, President, Muslim Association of Hawai’i

    Moderator: Clare Hanusz, Attorney, Aloha Immigration

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    FREE SCHOOL : Burning Crosses
    Sep
    13
    12:00 PM12:00

    FREE SCHOOL : Burning Crosses

    Burning Crosses and the intersectional feminist subjective: a critical race theorist responds to Charlottesville and the RAV case.

    Who : Professor Mari Matsuda, John Richardson School of Law, UH Manoa
    When : Weds. Sept. 13, 12:00 - 1:15PM
    Where : Burns Hall Rm. 2118 (East/West Center) UH Manoa

    In RAV vs. City of St. Paul, the US Supreme Court struck down a hate crime ordinance that was used to penalize the burning of a cross on a Black family’s front lawn. Critical race theorists have, for decades, challenged the analysis that treats racist hate speech as protected political expression, arguing that burning crosses are intended to, and have the effect of, assaulting victims - no different from spitting, shoving, and other acts of hate that are routinely criminalized. The fourth rise of the Ku Klux Klan, inaugurated on January 20, 2017, once again revives the hate speech/free speech debate.  My work supporting criminalization of hate speech is regularly attacked by civil libertarians, post-structuralist
    feminists (see Judith Butler’s Excitable Speech), as well as Nazis. This talk is an attempt to work through my disagreements with progressive allies in the context of a global reinvigoration of white supremacist hate groups, and to apply the deeply contextual, experiential, collective method of critical race theory to this work.

    About Matsuda : From her earliest academic publications, Matsuda has spoken from the perspective and increasingly used the method that has come to be known as critical race theory. She is not only one of its most powerful practitioners, but is among a handful of legal scholars credited with its origin. The voices she has in mind are the voices that have been left out, “outsider” voices speaking as individuals and as members of their communities of origin, voices of subordinate peoples.

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    FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB
    Sep
    12
    6:30 PM18:30

    FREE SCHOOL : BOOK CLUB

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    Continued Conversation on NO is not enough!, and more

    WHEN : Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 6:30pm
    WHERE : Chiko's Tavern (930 McCully)


    READINGS : (20 pages)

    1- out of the woods, On Climate / Borders / Survival / Care / Struggle (http://www.basepublication.org/?p=474)

    2- Beautiful Trouble (download)

    - principle: think narratively (p. 186-187)

    - turn the tables (p. 190-191)

    HOMEWORK : a demand for the j20+ manifesto

    Questions raised from Aug 22 Book Club...

    - What does a global commons look like specifically? What would a manifesto of such outline?

    - What are the potential lines of power when we think of a global identity instead of a national identity?

    - What can we take from Klein? Specifically I am conflicted about how to reconcile the need to leap forward rather than move incrementally

    - Should we make a list of demands (per Nandita) and not settle a focus for J20+? And who or what are we demanding this of? 
    - What is the power chain and where can we find our power in it?

    - Don't people need boundaries to have some semblance of order as they exist in the world?

    - Nonpartisan question campaigns (tag the streets with moral questions): 
    What type of work is worth more and why?
    What work is worth less and why? etc

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